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The sgENGAGE Podcast

Subscribe to The sgENGAGE Podcast to hear experts from across the social good community share best practices, tips and must-know trends that will help organizations increase their impact. Formerly called the Raise & Engage Podcast.
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Now displaying: February, 2020
Feb 27, 2020

Change comes in many different forms, whether it’s a new technology initiative, a new stakeholder or student engagement approach, change in leadership, crisis resolution, etc. So, what are the steps that institutions can take to implement sustainable change and realize the vision they’re trying to create through any transformation? 

Today’s guest, Drumm McNaughton, CEO of The Change Leader, Inc. talks with Blackbaud change management expert Michael Reardon about the best strategies for getting stakeholders involved in change efforts at higher education institutions and other social good organizations. Listen in to hear them discuss common types of institutional change, how to keep up momentum through change efforts, and how to maintain engaged users once a change has been implemented. 

Topics Discussed in This Episode:

  • The basic steps to implementing sustainable change
  • The differences between incremental, transformational and revolutionary change
  • How to get stakeholders involved in change efforts
  • The different kinds of people required in a change effort
  • What’s required from leadership during a change effort
  • Change management as a psychological process
  • Maintaining engaged users once a change is implemented
  • Best practices for engaging remote stakeholders
  • Pitfalls to avoid 

Resources:

Drumm McNaughton

Webinar: Proven Change Management Practices for High-Performing Institutions

Webinar: Digital Transformation: Getting Your Institution on Board

Tip Sheet: Six Steps for Implementing New Technology at Your Higher Education Institution 

Quotes: 

“We do something that we call the stakeholder input and attunement process.”

“We call skeptics our best friend.”

“Change management, however you call it, frankly it’s a psychological process, because you’re working with people and their mental models.”

Feb 20, 2020

Decision-making around directing philanthropic giving is an increasingly data-driven exercise. So, it’s more important than ever for social good organizations looking to attract investment to be able to quantify and communicate their defined outcomes and ability to efficiently and effectively achieve them. This is accountable impact.

Today’s episode features an excerpt of a panel session at bbcon 2019 with John Cashman, Senior Principal Account Executive and Tony Boor, Chief Financial Officer at Blackbaud, Paul Preziotti, Principal at Johnson Lambert LLP and Traci Drake, Chief Philanthropy Executive at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Listen in get an inside look at the 2019 Blackbaud Accountable Impact Study and to hear these experts discuss challenges and best practices around adopting a culture of accountable impact to drive support for your mission.

Topics Discussed in This Episode:

  • Background on Blackbaud’s 2019 Accountable Impact Study
  • Why the sub-competencies covered in this study were chosen
  • Finance benchmark competencies
  • Funding transparency
  • Promoting success from a financial perspective
  • Communication between the finance function and non-financial managers
  • Why so many nonprofits and social good organizations don’t feel enabled when it comes to technology
  • The interconnectivity of people, processes, and technology
  • Working with donors to fund capacity building needs

Resources:

Quotes: 

“The healthier an organization is in terms of vendor and credit management, the higher their overall competencies.” – John Cashman

“Most of the individuals who are making the key decisions don’t have a financial background. Your role in finance is to provide that link, from the accounting information.” –Paul Preziotti

“Technology is not a silver bullet. If you don’t have properly trained people, and you don’t have good processes, technology’s not going to solve it.” –Tony Boor

Feb 13, 2020

When you want the best information available, your best bet is to gather expert advice across a broad spectrum of professionals in the field you’re interested in. And that’s just what today’s guest has done. 

Martin Leifeld, CEO of Martin Leifeld LLC, is the author of Five Minutes for Fundraising: A Collection of Expert Advice from Gifted Fundraisers, which shares tips from a wide range of social good professionals. Listen in to hear Martin’s discussion with host Steve MacLaughlin, which focused on building relationships with major donors and maintaining involvement and engagement with those donors over a period of years. 

Topics Discussed in This Episode:

  • Key pieces of wisdom for fundraising professionals who are just starting their journey into major gifts
  • Building and nurturing long-term relationships with major donors
  • Managing expectations within your organization about major donors 
  • The 80/20 rule for donor relationships
  • Strategies for attracting and engaging with different types of donors

Resources:

Martin Leifeld

Five Minutes for Fundraising video series

Supporters in Sight: A Look at Affluent Donor Personas

Top Event Strategies for Major Donor Cultivation

Using Nonprofit Data to Find Your Next Major Donor

 Quotes: 

“The book overall really focuses on major gift engagement – major gift engagement for professionals and volunteers.”

“You have to educate your executives, you need to educate your board, you yourself perhaps as an executive director or significant volunteer or having the fundraising responsibility – you have to be educated.” 

“It’s very rare that there’s some kind of shortcut where a gift mystically magically appears at our doorstep that can change the course of our organization.”

Feb 6, 2020

This episode was originally published on April 18, 2018 as part of Blackbaud’s previous Raise & Engage Podcast.

Burnout. We’ve all been there or know someone who has. While work-life balance can be difficult for anyone to maintain, professionals in the non-profit sector face certain challenges that put them at a greater risk for experiencing burnout. How can you prevent burnout on an individual level, and how can an organization’s leadership help prevent employees from experiencing burnout?

Today’s guest is Beth Kanter, consultant, trainer, and author of the book, The Happy, Healthy Nonprofit: Strategies for Impact Without Burnout. Listen to today’s episode to hear what Beth has to say about burnout, why nonprofit employees are at risk for burnout, and how it can be prevented.

Topics Discussed in This Episode: 

  • What the term “burnout” means in the nonprofit sector and why it happens to nonprofit workers
  • The stages of burnout
  • How passion for a cause can be related to burnout
  • How to recognize the symptoms of burnout
  • How leadership can prevent burnout in their team
  • The effect that the workspace can have on employee wellbeing
  • The Pomodoro method for focusing
  • How mobile phones and other devices can affect the feeling of burnout
  • Different methods of self-care
  • How to be inclusive of remote team members and keep them engaged
  • First steps organizations and individuals can take to avoid burnout

Resources:

Beth Kanter
The Happy, Healthy Nonprofit

Quotes:

“I think we work in a field where scarcity mindsets lead. We don’t have enough staples in our staplers, or we don’t have enough staff, so I think this leads to trying to compensate by overworking.”

“Well-being is not something that’s foisted onto employees, right? They have to be engaged in it.”

“Start where you are, use what you have, do what you can.”

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